The Rise of Kop and Pop Culture in 1965 Liverpool

In Liverpool, music and football go hand in hand thanks to the rise in both Merseybeat and the quality of Merseyside football in the 1950’s. After Bill Shankly accepted the manager’s role at Liverpool football club there was a dramatic turnaround in performance and of course, Beatlemania began to traverse the globe as the boys made headlines with their unique sound.

The Shankly Museum holds vast archives of rare Shankly memorabilia but none showcase the link between Liverpool music and football so much as the telegram that will be unveiled to mark the two-year anniversary of The Sahnkllky Hotel opening. Shanks received the telegram from the FabFour on the day of the 1965 FA Cup Final when Liverpool played Leeds and won.

This remarkable piece of footballing and music memorabilia marks an upturn in the pop and Kop culture of Liverpool. These two fascinating phenomena took audiences across the world by storm creating a combined passion for Liverpool football and Merseybeat music.

Kop Culture

“I’m just one of the people who stands on the Kop. They think the same as I do, and I think the same as they do. It’s a kind of marriage of people who like each other.”

Shankly was loved by Liverpool, not just for what he did to transform the city’s beloved team but also for his quick wit and sharp humour. Scousers are known for being direct, straight talking people with hearts of gold and that’s just what Shankly was like.

source: Quotesgram

Above all Shankly was a down to earth man who knew the magnitude of the task he had ahead of him when he walked through the main entrance at Anfield in December 1959.

It wasn’t long before his work was rewarded as Liverpool football club climbed the ranks sweeping into division one by April 1962.

The turn around delighted fans who could be heard singing their hearts out from the Kop urging their players onward and upwards.

Fathers would drop their boys into the “boy’s pen” and go stand with their mates bellowing out tune after tune from the charts, which at the time was filled with tracks from local Merseybeat bands.

“The fans here are the greatest in the land. They know the game and they know what they want to see. The People on the Kop make you feel great – yet humble.”

Pop Culture

The rise in the quality of Liverpool football, thanks to Shanks’, mirrored another sweeping craze of the sixties; Beatlemania.

Four boys from the city were taking the music world by storm producing track after track, each hitting the UK top ten and holding their positions for weeks on end.

source: Pinterest

Of course, the people of Liverpool were jubilant at this point as two of their homegrown talents were sweeping the world and coming up trumps.

Liverpool Football club even played the top ten at Anfield matches through the PA system before the game as almost every song belonged to a Merseybeat band. This also became known as the earliest instance of pre-match entertainment.

Gerry and the Pacemakers, Cilla Black and The Beatles had arrived on the music scene as had Liverpool football club in the international world of football.

The synchronicity of the two occurrences stirred something inside the people of Liverpool creating the amazing mix of music loving football fans we have today.

The Beatles and Shankly

The Beatles are known for having no particular ties to either of the Merseyside football clubs and quite famously when Brian Epstein asked for tickets for the 1965 FA Cup final for the boys Shanks replied;

“I have never seen any of The Beatles standing on the Kop, any tickets I have spare will be going to my mates on the Kop.”

Never the less The Beatles sent support to their home team on the day of the 1965 FA Cup final against Leeds, the clubs greatest moment to date and a testament to Shankly, the man who put them there.

The FabFour sent a telegram wishing the team and Shanks the best of luck and letting them know they’d be watching on TV.

source: Twitter

Liverpool went on to play a gruelling match against Leeds, who also gave it their all, and the FA Cup final of 1965 went into extra time with no goals scored.

The first goal of extra time was scored in a matter of minutes putting Liverpool up by one, then Leed’s equalised seven minutes later making it neck and neck. The final goal was scored in the 117th minute by Liverpool winning the game and giving Liverpool their first-ever FA Cup triumph.

source: skysports.com

Could the Beatles telegram have given them the extra push to perform or was it just the brilliance of Shankly and the player’s reluctance to disappoint him and their fans?

All we know is that The Beatles telegram to Shanks now serves as a reminder of one of Liverpool’s finest footballing moments and Shankly’s “greatest day”.

The Shankly Hotel Museum

Come along and learn more about the man and legend Bill Shankly, take a guided tour of the museum and be recounted with heartwarming stories about the great man from those who knew him best, his family.

Take a Shankly Experience tour around Liverpool, discovering important sites of local history and heritage as well as seeing the hallowed grounds of Anfield or Goodison.

You can even stay the night with amazing accommodation offers that can include, overnight stays, breakfast or evening meals in luxury Shankly themed hotel rooms.

After two wonderful years have passed since we opened our doors to the public The Shankly Hotel has helped make some amazing memories for our guests, our staff and the city of Liverpool. We look forward to what the future holds at The Shankly Hotel.

Call on 0151 601 8801 or email info@signatureliving.co.uk and book your stay at The Shankly Hotel, Liverpool’s only football-themed city centre hotel.

The Best Cultural Attractions within Walking Distance of The Shankly Hotel

On the doorstep of the Shankly Hotel is a wealth of Liverpool culture that guests of The Shankly Hotel can walk to in under 15 minutes.

No matter where your interests lie, a simple hop skip and a jump will take you into several of Liverpool’s most widely visited cultural attractions.

We have put together a helpful guide so that you can make the most of your visit to Liverpool with The Shankly Hotel.

6 Fascinating Museums

Liverpool has a wide selection of museums both big and small, and what’s more, they are all within 15 minutes’ walk of The Shankly Hotel.

The World Museum – 4 minutes’ walk

Host to exhibitions about space, biology and natural history all giving visitors the chance to gain extensive knowledge on the planet we inhabit.

During interactive workshops inspired by museums exhibitions visitors can learn all there is to know about planet earth. From the deepest depths of the sea to the furthest reaches of space, there’s something for every age at The World Museum.

Western Approaches Museum – 11 minutes’ walk

Western Approaches Museum - Liverpool culture

For those with an interest in wartime history take a walk to Western Approaches Museum, an expertly restored bunker surviving from WW2.

Inside, war history enthusiasts can enjoy touring hidden rooms including The Map Room which has remained as it was from the day the doors were sealed in 1945.

The Western Approaches bunker played an important part in the strategy implemented during WW2 that some say had a massive impact on our victory.

The Museum of Liverpool – 15 minutes’ walk

Liverpool Museum - Liverpool culture

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A trip to the Museum of Liverpool will leave you with an in-depth knowledge of our fascinating city. Exhibitions on display depict the past, present and predicted future of Liverpool and teach visitors all that helped shape the landscape of the Liverpool we know today.

Information on the sporting and creative achievements of Liverpool’s people, as well as the impact of Liverpool maritime involvement, is all on display at the Museum of Liverpool.

The Piermaster’s House – 15 minutes’ walk

Piermaster's house - Liverpool culture

Source; www.flickr.com/photos/panr

On historical Albert Dock visitors to Liverpool can take a stroll around The Piermaster’s House. This stunning period building has been recreated in the style of a genuine WW2 homestead, complete with ration booklets and gas masks.

The original purpose of the dwelling was for the Piermaster and his family to stay, the Piermaster being responsible for directing ships in and out of Liverpool’s busy port in the latter half of the 18th century.

The Piermaster’s house is just one of four houses built that survived heavy bombings during the second world war.

The Merseyside Maritime Museum – 15 minutes’ walk

Merseyside Maritime - Liverpool culture

For an insight into  Liverpool’s maritime past, The Merseyside Maritime Museum has it all. There are theatrical performances recreating major moments from Liverpool shipping past as well as interactive lessons on LGBT lives in the Navy.

There are theatrical performances recreating major moments from Liverpool’s shipping history as well as interactive lessons on LGBT lives in the Navy.

A real chance to learn about how influential Liverpool was on the seas.

The International Slavery Museum – 15 minutes’ walk

International Slavery - Liverpool culture

source; www.clicknetherfield.com

The last museum in our list is the only one of its kind, serving to highlight the past and present day issues of the human slave trade.

The International Slavery Museum is home to some inspiring historical collections. Each tells the stories of countless individuals and their journeys. From being plucked out of their countries, documenting their harrowing journey across the sea to reach their destination to serve as slaves in America.

Although a troubling part of Liverpool’s past a visit to The International Slavery Museum is well worth it. Learn about the history of slave trade and the huge roll Liverpool played in the import and export of humans over the course of four centuries.

Must See Liverpool Landmarks

As well as museums, there are some exciting Liverpool landmarks that are not to be missed all within walking distance from the Shankly Hotel.

Three Graces – 15-minutes’ walk

Three Graces Liverpool culture

The Liver Building, Cunard Building and Port of Liverpool Building are three of Liverpool’s most iconic structures. Sitting proudly along the Mersey River these three buildings played a huge part in Liverpool’s long history.

The Cunard building was home to the Cunard shipping line and has recently celebrated its 100th birthday. Now owned by Merseyside Pension Fund the Cunard Building has hosted short exhibitions and public events.

The Liver building was originally constructed to house the Royal Liver Assurance group who assisted families when a wage-earning member was lost.

When the Liver building was originally constructed it was the tallest in the city and one of the first buildings made with reinforced concrete. It is now a nest for symbols of the city the Liver Birds and an iconic part of Liverpool’s unforgettable skyline.

The Port of Liverpool building is a stunning architectural creation noted in Liverpool for its ornamental detailing.

The domed centre and surrounding cupolas give the Port of Liverpool building a somewhat palatial appearance.

All three buildings make up a large part of the UNESCO World Heritage Waterfront each is a definite must see during any visit to the city for learning more about Liverpool culture.

Albert Dock – 20 minutes’ walk

Albert Dock Liverpool culture

The very first building in the UK to be built without using wood and thus Albert Dock was the first non-combustible dock warehouse in the world.

After a peak in business being used as a docking facility fast advances in shipping technology relegated Albert dock to use as a storage facility.

Then commissioned by the Admiralty during WW2, Albert Dock provided a base for the British Atlantic Fleet.

After this Albert Dock was unused for approximately a decade until Merseyside Development Corporation was created and took control of the renovation.

Since re-opening in 1984 Albert Dock has become a major tourist attraction home to a few Liverpool museums and art galleries as well as a host of popular bars and restaurants.

St George’s Hall – 5 minutes’ walk

St George's Hall Liverpool culture

One of Liverpool’s most visually appealing buildings is St Georges Hall.

Originally built to host music festivals, banquets and concerts, today this stunning venue still houses some of Liverpool’s most exciting events. These include live music performances, culinary and vintage fairs, corporate events and even weddings.

Perhaps the most striking feature of St Georges Hall is the Great Hall, with ornate tiled flooring and gilded carvings, a breath-taking sight to behold.

Visitors can view St George’s hall as part of a tour or during a visit to one of the amazing events taking place.

Remarkable statues, memorials and monuments

• Eleanor Rigby statue – 3 minutes’ walk
• Wellington memorial – 9 minutes’ walk
• Queen Victoria monument – 8 minutes’ walk
• Titanic memorial – 15 minutes’ walk
• Lennon statue – 5 minutes’ walk
• Cilla Black statue – 5 minutes’ walk

Our own slice of Liverpool’s historical culture

Bill Shankly museum Liverpool culture

The Shankly Hotel is the ideal place to stay for an experience of Liverpool’s interesting past. Even in the hotel itself, guests can learn all about one of Liverpool’s most iconic player/managers Bill Shankly.

Our Bill Shankly Museum details the life and career of Shankly, with rare memorabilia on display that includes handwritten letters, award and medals, even a training tracksuit from his time at LFC.

Learn all you can about Liverpool culture from the past and present during a visit to the Shankly Hotel.

Book your visit today here or call 0151 601 8801.

3 Unique Ways to Explore Liverpool’s History

Have you ever wanted to explore a piece of Liverpool’s history that’s a little off the beaten track?

If so we recommend one of these three unique tourist experiences that will show you pieces of Liverpool’s past from a unique perspective.

Slavery Trail

Take a walk back in time and explore Liverpool’s history by learning about what helped shape the exuberant waterfront architecture and early wealth of the city.

Liverpool waterfront

Liverpool’s position on the Mersey River made city docks the hub of UK trade from overseas. Goods such as tobacco, spices, cotton and Gin flowed through Liverpool bringing extreme wealth and prosperity to the area.

This wealth was also built on the sale of humans as goods at the peak of slave trading.

In what was once known as the ‘Slave Trade Triangle’ Liverpool played a crucial role.

The port of Liverpool served as the beginning and end point for a staggering three-quarters of the slaving ships coming to and from Africa and the Caribbean.

There are traces of this sad part of Liverpool’s history all around us, in the artwork found on the cities most prominent buildings and monuments.

Slavery in Liverpool

The Liverpool Slavery Trail is operated Eric Lynch, a man who has educated himself on the intricate details of Liverpool’s history.

Eric shares this wealth of knowledge with those partaking in the walkign city tour.

Shankly Experience

Another huge part of Liverpool’s interesting history is football.

Evident in the numerous tours in operation that ferry visitors around the two major premier league football stadiums and training grounds in the city.

We recommend another way to explore the unique footballing history of Liverpool with our Shankly Experience tour.

Take a journey with the Shankly Family Foundation and learn how the power of one man transformed a football club and stirred inspiration across a city of people.

Bill Shankly

Pioneering the ‘Liverpool way of play’, Bill Shankly made the city famous through football. Because of his efforts at LFC, his working-class background and outstanding moral compass, the people of Liverpool loved him.

His character was admired by many, known as a stand-up family man dedicated only to his wife, children and the game of football.

During a visit to the Shankly Hotel take a chance to explore a piece of Liverpool’s history through various displays of Shankly memorabilia.

Never before seen iconic items donated by the Shankly family can be viewed, such as rare photos and his own training tracksuit. This, as well as handwritten letters and tactics notes, give visitors a keen insight into the mind and life of the great man.

Why not book an exclusive training session on Shankly playing field to see where Bill Shankly worked and played during his Liverpool career?

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Participants can enjoy running drills fashioned from handwritten notes taken from Shankly archives and learn to understand the ethos of Bill Shankly; that you can play hard as long as you work harder.

You can even play in and keep a limited-edition training kit as a memento.

The Shankly Tours and training experiences are bookable here and are a unique way to explore Liverpool’s history from a different perspective.

Williamson Tunnel tours

There are some magnificent sights across Liverpool city centre.

The Three Graces, The Anglican and Metropolitan Cathedrals and Albert Dock are all stunning pieces of Liverpool history…above ground.

How about what lies beneath the city?

Liverpool's history underground - Williamson's tunnels

source; www.tunnelvision.com

In 1995 a series of tunnels were discovered by a university student beneath the streets of Liverpool. Since then these tunnels have been slowly excavated by volunteers.

The tunnels are the work of a wealthy tobacco baron, Joseph Williamson. After building what were known to have been grand mansions of unconventional design, Williamson moved onto constructing his obscure series of underground tunnels.

His reasons behind constructing these tunnels remain unknown but have been widely speculated upon.

Theories include Williamson’s involvement in a religious sect, convinced the apocalypse was looming. The tunnels, therefore, built as a post-apocalyptic haven for Williamson, his family and friends.

Others suspected Williamson of being involved in smuggling using the tunnels to transport goods across the city undetected.

A popular explanation is that Williamson’s tunnels were built to employ hundreds of soldiers returning from the Napoleonic war.

Liverpool's history underground - Williamson's tunnels

source; www.tunnelvision.com

It seems construction carried on for 70 years and ceased immediately after Williamson’s death.

Now the Joseph Williamson Society are exploring this mysterious piece of Liverpool’s history concealed within these fascinating underground structures. You too can explore the Labyrinth as part of a guided tour and check out the progress of ongoing excavation.

Explore Liverpool’s History from the Shankly Hotel

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If you are planning a short city break, then explore Liverpool’s history during one or all of these unique city tours.

Other popular city attractions such as the amazing nightlife and superb shopping complexes are within easy reach of the Shankly Hotel.

Why not book to stay at the Shankly Hotel and see what you can learn about the interesting history of Liverpool?

Call 0151 601 8801 or email ifno@signatureliving.co.uk.

Justice at Last

Justice at last, but ignorant comments will always be something we have to contend with in respect of Hillsborough.

I haven’t blogged for a while, so today I took it upon myself to make a resolution to take the written word much more often than I am presently.

My focus today turns to the events of the last few weeks that saw 27 years of injustice, cover-ups and lies finally exposed and set to right. Hillsborough is such an emotive topic and opinions around it stir so many reactions.

I was seven years old at the time and hadn’t quite started to make the transition to the match-going-regular I am today. I’d gone to a few games at Anfield on the family’s season tickets but nothing more, and my love affair with ‘that bird’ was only in its flirtatious period. My Dad, however, made the journey to Sheffield for the game; courtesy of obtaining a ticket for the seated section through my grandmother, Nessie Shankly.

The Shankly 96 Wall

I remember on the day I was at a school friend’s birthday party (Tony Lamb, if I remember correctly). I recall my Mum picking me up after the party – after those tragic events had unfolded – and telling me there had been a crush at the ground but my Dad was okay. He returned home that night and vomited in the toilet, scarred by what he had witnessed that day.

My immediate memory is as a seven-year-old, trying to get my head around how people had been crushed at a football game. I remember asking my Mum if the roof had collapsed, because that was how I understood ‘crushing’. She explained no, and from that moment I always struggled to comprehend how people can be crushed by other people. Even as a 34-year-old, who has travelled everywhere with Liverpool FC in his life, I struggled to get my head around it – until I watched the BBC2 documentary a couple of evenings ago.

Massive respect to Phil Scraton for what he has done for the campaign and his fight for justice. The documentary was brilliant in showing the world the extent of the lies and cover-up by the establishment, and what the families had to go through on the day, in the immediate aftermath and the following 27 years.

The documentary also served to show the harrowing images of what the Liverpool fans and the victims went through on the day, as a result of the incompetence and failures of the authorities to safely look after them. In many ways, it finally showed me how something like that could happen, but, more importantly, it firmly shown who was responsible and who WASN’T.

Over the course of the 27 years, the brave, dignified families fought against the odds for justice for their loved ones and our survivors, for this city, in fact. As a Liverpool fan, I, as well as many others, have had to put up with vile chants and comments aimed at us in respect of the disaster. As a much younger lad, I would often get drawn and end up arguing or reacting, giving these ignorant people just what they wanted. Yet as time went on and I matured, I was able to express my opinion in a measured way; one that stated the facts and, crucially, an opinion that I knew to be true and would one day be proven to be so.

You see, I always knew the truth would out. An easy thing to say many might state now that it has happened, but I was always confident we would get justice. In the days before the verdicts, speaking with many of the families, they would tell you I stated how confident I was. The reason being: you don’t pick on this city and its people and expect to get away with it. We will not be supressed and never will be. The families who so bravely led the fight could not be more of a shining example that embodies that sentiment. When one of us is hurting or falls, another will pick that person up, dust them off and pull them back into the fight. We are unique and there is nobody like us.

Chris-Carline

In recent years, we have held a number of tributes and memorials at The Shankly Hotel, and I have been absolutely privileged to get to know and become friends with many of the families and friends of the victims. Seeing them up close, hearing what they have been through, learning of their fight and how they have fought, it has been nothing less than inspiring to me. I count them as friends for life and they should all, every single of them, be given the highest of honours.

I am just so proud to have been able to do something for them here at the hotel that does their loved ones proud, and I am even more honoured that many of them see this place as somewhere they can come and call ‘home’. There can be no greater honour for us than that.

Now the truth is out and justice is served, I just hope that those responsible for the deaths of our 96, and those who lied and colluded to precipitate the biggest cover-up in this country’s history, get what they deserve in terms of punishment. But never forget that the reason they are all now being held accountable. The reason the biggest cover-up in this country’s history has been exposed. The reason justice has been delivered to the 96, our fans, the survivors, the families and the city. It is due to the sheer willpower, persistence and drive of the families. For that, we can never say thank you enough to them. Whilst the intervention of ‘death’ has spared the hand of justice delivering punishment to some, others will now experience just a small fraction of what the families have endured for the last 27 years. Anxiety, pain and suffering as to what fate awaits them.

Despite all of the recent events, you have to ask the question whether we will ever ENTIRELY escape the ignorant comments and opinions on Hillsborough. Just this morning, Sky and ITV’s Eamon Holmes had the audacity to compare Manchester United’s team bus being attacked violently last night by West Ham fans as being a throwback to what we saw “in the 70s and 80s, the type of thing you were seeing that was bad about Hillsborough, for instance”. Wow! A comment that clearly translates to me that that fan violence was to blame for Hillsborough. Did Mr Holmes not watch the verdicts come in? Did he not see the response, in particular to question 7, which stated clearly that fans were not to blame.

memorial

When the story broke this morning, my immediate reaction was that it was sheer ignorance and that he had engaged his mouth before his brain. I actually tweeted and put on Facebook that if he comes out and just admits that and apologises unreservedly, he might at least claw back some respect. Alas, he did move fast to apologise, but the nature and content of it was, in my opinion, quite frankly pathetic and actually nonsensical, which to me reeks of it carrying no authenticity.

He has claimed people accusing him of a slur on the 96 and Liverpool fans are stirring up trouble, and that he was trying to say these are images we never want to see again, which is why he brought Hillsborough into it. So how does 96 people being crushed to death compare to images of a bus smashed violently by football fans?

If he had simply apologised and admitted it was mouth engaged before brain (we’ve all done it), he’d have got a bit more leniency, but his ‘official’ apology just smacks of him trying to protect himself and, for that reason, he deserves what he gets now.

Alas, let’s not finish on a negative. I’d simply like to dedicate this post to the 96, their families and friends, the survivors, fans, the people of this city and everyone involved in the fight for justice. As I said in the immediate aftermath of the verdicts last week, my Nan, Nessie Shankly, my hero, was involved in the early days of the fight for justice before she passed away in 2002. She is a REAL Iron Lady, just like those who lead the fight for justice. Whilst, like many others, she never managed to hang on for that amazing day when justice was delivered, I know she will have been sat ‘up there’ with them all, despite the fact she wasn’t born and bred here in Liverpool, smiling down on us all and saying, “that is my city and these are my people”.

13 Reasons Why The Shankly Hotel Won Simply the Guest

Have you heard the wonderful news? The Shankly Hotel has been rated the best UK Luxury Hotel on Late Rooms. We are absolutely ecstatic to scoop the sought-after ‘Simply the Guest’ award, and believe it is a testament to the hard work and passion delivered by our growing team.

We are proud to have received such a prestigious accolade, so we thought we’d take a look at what makes The Shankly Hotel stand out from the crowd.

1. Our Hard-working Team

From the front of house team all the way to the sales department, The Shankly Hotel is full to the brim with hard-working individuals, who ensure we deliver exceptional customer service day after day. Without them, we could not have achieved this accolade in just eight months.

2. Luxurious Rooms

You can guarantee you are in for one comfortable night sleep when you book a stay at The Shankly Hotel. Offering relaxing double beds, a double Jacuzzi bath and plush interior, you will want to spend each and every second of your stay in the comfort of your hotel room.

3. The Bastion Bar & Restaurant

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When you do decide to leave your luxurious room, you can join us for dinner downstairs at The Bastion Bar & Restaurant. Our talented chefs lovingly create delicious dishes created from fresh, local ingredients. So, whether you feel like Salmon or a burger, there will be something for you at our stylish Liverpool restaurant.

4. Bill Shankly Memorabilia

The first thing you’ll notice when you head into our restaurant in Liverpool is the Bill Shankly memorabilia on display. You can view various items throughout the bar and restaurant, which were donated from the Shankly family’s private collection. You can view everything from Bill Shankly’s personal typewriter, clothing and his letters to and from fans.

5. Superb Service

As we have already mentioned, our passionate team have created the well-oiled machine that is The Shankly Hotel. You can therefore guarantee you’ll receive an exceptional service from start to finish. Our goal is to cater to our guests’ every requirements, and we encourage feedback to ensure we can continue to deliver a superb service time after time.
Whether you need extra towels in your room, another glass of wine to toast a fantastic stay or just something taken off your dish, our team will be happy to offer a helping hand at every opportunity.

6. Shankly Tours

The Shankly Hotel has been founded by the hotel provider Signature Living and the Shankly Family – so there’s no better football tours in Liverpool. We are thrilled to provide six fantastic tour options for our guests to choose from. Both children and adults can attend the tours, which can take you to Shankly’s West Derby home and St George’s Hall where he delivered his ‘Chairman Mao’ speech.

7. Famous Guests

The wonderful thing about The Shankly Hotel is that you never know who will be passing through our days. Previous guests have included Megan McKenna and David Hasselhoff, and we also regularly welcome a number of sporting stars to deliver Q&As at The Bastion Bar & Restaurant during a big LFC game. Just some of the football stars to visit the hotel include footballing legends Alan Kennedy, Ian Callaghan and Phil Neal.

8. Group Accommodation

The Shankly Hotel

Unlike other hotels, our aim is to bring guests together through spacious, comfortable and stylish accommodation. We don’t split our guests into different rooms; we offer flexible accommodation that allows everyone to create amazing memories in one location. So, if you are planning a hen party, stag party, birthday party or another special event, be sure to book a stay at our beautiful hotel in Liverpool.

9. Afternoon Tea

The Bastion Bar & Restaurant’s afternoon tea has become incredibly popular, as guests can enjoy scrumptious finger sandwiches, cakes and traditional jam and cream scones. It’s therefore a wonderful dining experience to celebrate an anniversary or birthday, or to just your loved ones’ company.

10. Onsite Parking

You don’t have to worry about where to put your car when you stay at The Shankly Hotel – as we offer onsite parking underneath the hotel. You can park your car for just £1.50 for up to five hours, or can spend just £8.50 to park for between five and eight hours. However, if you’re staying in our hotel, we recommend paying just £10 for car parking from between 8 to 24 hours.

11. Central Location

Our central location means you’re never too far away from the city’s best attractions and transport links. Whether you’re staying with us to explore our wonderful city, visiting loved ones who live in Liverpool or are set to attend an event, you won’t find a better destination in the city centre. We’re just a short walk away from the city’s high street shops, train stations, bus stops and famous landmarks.

12. Private Dining

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Do you want to celebrate a special event in an intimate setting? Well, consider Little Eden, which can play host to a number of events, including small weddings, engagement celebrations, baby showers, birthday dinners and more. Our beautiful interior will provide the perfect backdrop to your event, whilst our dedicated team will ensure it runs smoothly, so you can simply focus on toasting to a wonderful evening.

13. The Story

The whole of Liverpool fell in love with Bill Shankly – who changed the face of Liverpool FC forever. The humble Scot made Liverpool his home after enjoying a successful career as LFC’s manager, pulling them up from a Division Two club to a Premier League team.

Settling in West Derby with his wife, Nessie, and their children, the family have grown up in the city. Immensely proud of Bill Shankly’s legacy, the family have chosen to create a luxurious hotel inspired by the legendary football player and manager, in conjunction with Signature Living.

This is only the start of The Shankly Hotel – as work on the second phase of the hotel begun just last month – and we plan to create a rooftop bar and install a 100ft slide. So, if you haven’t done so already, book a stay with us to experience our unique hotel in Liverpool for yourself.

Call our friendly team today on 0151 601 8801 or email info@signatureliving.co.uk for more information.

The Life of Bill Shankly

Bill Shankly is an inspiration. Not only to football, but to anyone who has ever faced struggles in their life. He was born in the coalmining village of Glenbuck, Ayshire, in 1913, with very humble beginnings; however, through hard work and perseverance, he went onto become one of the greatest football managers of all time.

Bill Shankly was undoubtedly a very intelligent man, despite the fact he left education at just 14 years old to begin work at a local colliery. Not shy of hard work, Bill spent two years down the pit; however, he seen football as his way out of it.

Professional Football

Shankly was one of 50 Glenbuck son’s who escaped the coalmining village to make it in professional football in the first half of the 20th Century; however, none of them would leave a legacy behind quite like William. The Shankly family all shared a passion for the big game, with four of Bill’s brothers all making it as professional footballers.

Shankly finally made it as a professional footballer when he signed for Carlisle United in 1932, but it was at Preston North End where he really shone on the pitch, when he joined the club just one year later in 1933.

Shankly was a brave right half who made a total of 337 appearances for the club, helping the team to win the FA Cup in 1938; however, his time at Preston North End was interrupted by his service in the RAF in World War II. Like all aspiring footballers dream of, Bill Shankly played for his national team, Scotland, between 1938 to 1943, and often spoke of his “unbelievable pride” when they played against England, winning the match 1-0.

Shankly leading out Preston FC

What made Shankly different from many of the players on the pitch was that he believed the game should be played fairly, and was proud to say he was “never sent off the field or had (his) name in a referee’s book”. To him, tackling was an art that was all about timing and the sole objective of winning the ball – and he stood by this philosophy through his management career.

Shankly was, by no stretch of the imagination, in love with football. During the summer of 1933, he event spent his spare time training, and it is claimed he developed a unique long throw-in by throwing balls over a row of houses, asking the boys of the village to retrieve them for him.

Management Career

Carlisle United

Whilst Shankly was a successful footballer, it was his management career that would define his legacy. Shankly started his managerial career the same way he started as a professional footballer: at Carlisle United. He joined as manager during the 1948-49 season, when the club was in the bottom half of the Third Division North. With sheer hard work and unrivalled skills, Shankly ensured Carlisle United finished 15th in the table, after only being in charge for just a few matches. It was here that Shankly’s management potential was born.

Shankly used the power of psychology to motivate his players, falsely informing the team that the opposition were not fit for the match or that the opposition had a tough journey to the ground. After a disagreement with the club over player bonuses, Shankly resigned from the club and took up an offer from Grimbsy Town, following a failed interview at Liverpool FC.

Grimsby Town

Shankly was to make or break Grimsby Town, as they had been relegated twice in two seasons, dropping from First Division to Third. Some of the club’s best players had also been transferred before he even arrived as manager. However, Bill strongly believed there was more potential at Grimsby Town than at Carlisle United, and was pleased with some of the remaining players he still had to work with.

Shankly Grimsby

Bill brought new players to the club for low fees, which helped to make a challenge for promotion in 1951-52, but the club finished second, just three points behind Lincoln City. Following a disagreement with the club for their lack of ambition, and due to him and his wife feeling homesick for their native Scotland, Bill Shankly made the decision to take up an offer as manager for Workington to be closer to home.

Workington

Bill enthusiastically joined the club in 1954, seeing Workington as a challenge he believed he could win. When he joined, Workington were at the bottom of the Third Division North, but by the end of the of the 1954-55 season the team finished at a credible 8th place.

During his time at Workington, Shankly was responsible for many of the administration duties, and would often answer calls and deal with mail. However, Shankly’s problem was that Workington shared the ground with a local rugby club, which he believed was ruining the playing surface. On 15th November 1955, Shankly resigned at manager and joined Huddersfield Town, but this time as assistant manager to Andy Beattie.

Huddersfield Town

Shankly initially joined Huddersfield Town as assistant manager, but took over the role of manager in 1956 when Andy Beattie resigned. Shankly was responsible for the signing of some of football’s most rising talents at the time, including 16-year-old Denis Law, and Huddersfield Town’s most capped player, Ray Wilson.

However, Shankly resigned from the club when they intended to sell the team’s best players with no money to buy replacements, and delightfully accepted an offer at Liverpool FC as manager in 1959.

Liverpool FC

Shankly believed Liverpool had great potential, as the club had been in Second Division for five years prior to his arrival. Bill Shankly knew that in order for the club to succeed, major changes were necessary. Liverpool Football Club was a shadow of the ground fans know and love today, and it is all thanks to the legendary manager who insisted that £3,000 was spent to repair Anfield and water the pitch.

He also immediately connected to the club’s supporters, who he believed were “his kind of people”. Few could argue that it was Shankly’s forceful personality that transformed Liverpool. He brought a sense of pride, loyalty and determination that no other Liverpool manager ever had, and his passion for the game was infectious.

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He also knew that in order to succeed new players would need to be brought in. Shankly separated the wheat from the chaff, bringing in new players that helped the club make history, including the likes of Ian St John, Tommy Lawrence and Ian Callaghan.

Despite a shaky start, the team improved season by season, and by the end of Bill Shankly’s management career at the club, Liverpool FC had become a First Division club that had won two FA Cups (1965 and 1974), the UEFA Cup (1973) and the FA Charity Shield in 1964, 1965 and 1966.

Retirement

With a heavy heart, Bill Shankly called a press conference on 12th July 1974 to announce his retirement from football. He reportedly felt tired from all the years of management, and finally decided the time was right at the age of 60 years old.

However, whilst Shankly said goodbye to football, football would not say goodbye to him. Shankly would regularly visit Melwood to watch the LFC players training, then managed by Bob Paisley. He would also often attend Manchester United and Everton games, and praised the clubs for the warm welcome.

In honour of his football career, Bill was awarded an OBE in November 1974, attending Buckingham Palace with his wife, Nessie. Bill fell in love with the city of Liverpool as much as the city fell in love with him, so he and Nessie continued to live in their semi-detached house in the West Derby area, which was closely located to Everton’s training ground at Bellefield.

Tragically, Bill Shankly died on 29th September 1981 at the age of 68 years old, but his legacy lives on in the hearts of football fans across the world and at Liverpool FC.

5 Shankly Tributes from Past and Present LFC Footballers and Managers

Bill Shankly changed Liverpool Football Club forever. He pulled the team out of second division, which ultimately led to the world-class five times Champions League winning club we know and love today.

His achievements undoubtedly had an impact not just on the club, but on the team’s legacy, future managers and players. We therefore thought it was high-time we took a look back at some tributes to the great man from past and present Liverpool managers and players.

1. Kenny Dalglish

Fellow Scot Kenny Dalglish is one of Liverpool’s finest players and managers, which led to his nickname King Kenny by the club’s supporters. His time playing football at Liverpool were some of the club’s most successful years, as he helped to win six Football League First Divisions, two FA Cups, four League Cups, seven FA Charity Shields, three European Cups and one UEFA Super Cup.

His time as manager was just as successful, as his experience, support and management skill resulted in Liverpool winning three First Divisions, two FA Cups and Four Charity Shields.

The video below shows just how much of an influence Bill Shankly was not only to Liverpool FC but to Kenny Dalglish.

2. Jamie Carragher

Recently retired Jamie Carragher was an integral member of the club since his debt in 1996, and is the club’s second-longest serving player. His honours include two FA Cups, three League Cups, two Community Shields, one Champions League, one UEFA Cup and two Super Cups.

Here Jamie talks about Shankly’s influence on Liverpool FC, the supporters and the city of Liverpool.

3. Roger Hunt

When Bill Shankly joined Liverpool FC in 1959, the club had been in Second Division for five years, Anfield was in a state of disrepair and there were no means of watering the pitch. Bill Shankly insisted the club spent £3,000 to rectify the problem, and placed 24 players on the transfer list. Roger Hunt, however, remained a part of the team and was a major factor in Liverpool’s success during the 1960s.

Roger Hunt was undoubtedly influenced by Shankly during his time with the reds, as the below video demonstrates…

4. Roy Evans

Roy Evans is a former Liverpool player who rose through coaching ranks to become a successful football manager. He joined Liverpool in 1994 when the team were in rapid decline, as the club struggled to recover from Kenny Daglish’s departure four years earlier. Roy Evans was pinnacle in assembling one of the most exciting side’s Liverpool FC had ever seen, picking a team of talented players that created an impressive team, which consisted of Steve McManaman, Robbie Fowler, Stan Collymoore and 17-year-old Michael Owen.

It was Bill Shankly that spotted potential in Roy Evans, and it was he who suggested the ex-Liverpool player try a career as a coach. Here Evans talks about how Shankly was an inspiration to him, the fans and the club.

5. Brendan Rodgers

Brendan Rodgers has recently been hailed by the press as the new Bill Shankly, as he helped the club end the 2014 league season with 101 goals scored – the club’s highest number since the 1895-96 season, and the third-highest in Premier League History. He was also awarded the LMA Manager of the Year Award in May 2014.

Watch Brendan Rodgers speak about how Shankly inspires him and Liverpool FC.

Has Shankly inspired you? Tell us how by dropping us a comment below.

The 5 Greatest Football Managers in History

There are some football managers that should never be forgotten for their management skills, achievements and the general passion they brought to the game. For this reason, we take a look back at 5 of the greatest managers of all time.

1. Bill Shankly

Shankly

Bill Shankly was a remarkable manager due to his unrelenting passion for the game. After a lengthy career as a professional footballer, playing nearly 300 times in the league for Preston North End and seven times for his native Scotland, he knew the game like the back of his hand, if not better.

He was as honest as he was determined, and respected the fans more than the people that signed his pay cheque. One of his most notable management decisions was ensuring the LFC ground was renovated, whilst stripping out team’s average players to introduce talented footballers. He was inspiration to many both on and off the pitch, and changed how Liverpool FC played the game, taking them out of second division and making them champions.

2. Sir Matt Busby

Matt Busby was a phenomenal manager, and was the backbone of Manchester United between 1945 to 1969, returning again for the second half of the 1970-71 season. Despite his history as a football player at two of United’s biggest rivals, Liverpool FC and Manchester City, he went on to serve as the longest Manchester United manager in history, helping the team win the FA Cup in 1948 and the league championship in 1952.

3. Bob Paisley

Bob Paisley had a lot to live up to following Shankly’s departure from LFC, as it is fair to say the fans fell in love with the Scottish manager. However, Bob Paisley proved he was up to the task, as in 9 years as manager he helped the team take home six league titles, three European Clubs, one UEFA cup, three league cups, five Community shields and the UEFA Super Cup.

4. Brian Clough

Brian Clough sealed his fate as one of the country’s finest football managers when he pulled Derby County from Second Division to crown them Champions of England in 1973. Instead of riding high on one successful team, Clough helped pull another team out from Second Division, Nottingham Forest, helping the club win back-to-back European Cups.

5. Sir Alf Ramsey

Sir Alf Ramsey is one of the most successful England managers in history, helping the national team win the 1966 World Cup on 30th July 1966. However, he didn’t stop there, as he ensured the club came in thirds in the 1968 European Championship, and his guidance ensured England reached the quarter-final stage of the 1970 World Cup, as well as the 1972 European Championship.

Have you got a favourite football manager that’s not listed above? Tell us who your favourites are. We’d love to hear your thoughts.

Fish and Chips from the Chippy. Shanks’ Birthday’s were a very normal affair!

On Grandy’s 101st Birthday I thought it would be nice to bring you all a small snippet. The third installment from an interview with my mum Jeanette and daughter of Bill Shankly.

And there is no better occasion than to bring you a birthday related story. I simply asked the question;

“So what would a normal birthday occasion be like with Grandy?” to be told, “It depends if Liverpool were playing!”

That gives you some idea of what life must have been like with Shanks as your dad. His commitment to Liverpool football club unwavering as ever; but I did manage to glean some extra info from mum via persistence. “So what if Liverpool weren’t playing and he was at home with the family?”

Bill Shankly and family

The response was that it was all rather a normal affair. “We’d just sit with him and take him his presents and cards.” And what do you get the man who has everything (her phrase not mine). “The last present we ever got him for a birthday was a special posh case that contained high end items for cleaning and polishing your shoes. He was obsessed with his shoes being clean and polished and wouldn’t accept anything less, so naturally he was pleased with the gift.”

Following the giving of presents, would the family go out for a posh meal to some swanky restaurant?

Hardly. Mum advises that either Nan would cook or even more so, they would go to the much loved local Chippy on Eaton Road. “He loved our local chippy so we usually just went there and got Fish and Chips. He wasn’t a fussy eater so would get a variety of things whenever we went there. He’d usually send one of the son in law’s down to get it; but more often than not would head down himself; in the car! (see previous blogs to qualify my use of the exclamation mark).”

“Every now and then we would go out to eat but there were only a few places he would go when eating out with one in particular his favourite.”

You’ll have to wait for future blogs and the tour to find out that well known Liverpool location!

Happy Birthday Grandy.

XXX

The Five Most Iconic Shankly Images

When you hear the words Bill Shankly, various images spring to mind. These images are what capture him as the powerful, determined, and loved manager of Liverpool who is still etched in our memories today.
Here are just five of our favourites, which we think shows Shanks’ passion for the beautiful game.

 

Bill Shankly leading out LFC before the FA cup final, 1974

Bill Shankly leads out the Liverpool side for the FA cup final. 7th May 1974.
In this game, Liverpool lost to Arsenal during extra time.
Bill is smartly dressed in his tie and collar, even on a hot day. He has his hand on his heart and a Liverpool football club badge on his lapel.

Shankly looking straight into the camera, looking thoroughly self-assured and you can just imagine how the players must have been so inspired having a man such as him leading them out!

 

Shankly celebrates with the kop

Liverpool manager Bill Shankly rejoices with the Kop after Liverpool secured the football league championship with a draw against Leicester City at Anfield on 27th April 1973.
With his LFC scarf on and fists out, the spectators at the ground reach out to him like some sort of managerial demigod.

This really sums up what Shanks was about, he was in it for the fans and wanted to make them happy most of all.

 

Shankly leading out Preston FC

Shankly leads out Preston North End in 1948, a year before he left the club.
He went straight into management after his playing career was over, despite feeling like he had more to give. He firstly went to Carlisle, and then with Grimsby, Workington and Huddersfield.
It was when he joined Liverpool as their manager in 1959 that his legend really began to take shape.

 

Bill playing football with locals at Huddersfield

This is Bill during his time managing at Huddersfield FC.
Rumour has it that, he was always up for playing football with Dads and lads on the park somewhere in Huddersfield town. The local press must have learned of this and went to watch and took photographs. There’s Shankly going up for a header and you can be sure that whatever side he was playing on, they would keep going until his team won!

 

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Shanks revels in the ambience of The Kop after losing to Arsenal in the 1971 FA Cup Final.
Despite the score, the Reds came back to the city to an incredible homecoming.
The supporters were all cheering and showing their support for Shankly and his players. Steve Hale stood on St George’s plateau and was amongst a bunch of other photographers who called out to Bill Shankly to turn around and face them. Then a succession of images that terminated with this one.

 

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Bill Shankly: A Timeline of Events

Shankly’s life was an interesting one to say the least. From being born in Glenbuck, to living in Liverpool as an honourary Scouser till the end.
Here’s a timeline of important events during Shankly’s 68 year life and beyond!

The early years

02.09.1913 – William Shankly is born in Glenbuck, Scotland.

1931 – He plays football for his local team in Ayrshire, Cronberry Eglinton.

1932 – Shankly moves south where he joins Carlisle United in Third Division North.

July 1933 – After a remarkable season for Carlisle Shankly signs for 2nd division Preston North End. Preston was soon promoted as Shankly’s career flourished.

Young Shankly

09.04.1938 – Shankly was selected to play for his country, Scotland for the first time, playing against England in a 1-0 win at Wembley.

30.04.1938 – Shankly’s highlight as player when Preston wins the FA Cup by beating Huddersfield.

29.06.1944 – Bill marries Agnes “Nessie” Fisher

Bill and Agnes Shankly

From player to manager

22.03.1949 – Despite feeling he had more to offer as a player, 35-year-old Shankly took the manager’s job at Carlisle United.

June 1951 – Grimsby’s board felt Shankly was the right man to revive the club that had dropped from Division 1 to regional football in Division 3.

1951 – Liverpool interview Shankly for the vacant manager’s job at Liverpool.

06.01.1954 – Shankly moves down the ranking in Third Division North, but saving Workington from destruction is a commendable challenge.

05.11.1956 – Takes over as manager of Huddersfield after coaching their reserves for 11 months.

01.12.1959 – Liverpool appoint Bill Shankly as Phil Taylor’s successor in the managerial seat.

Shankly arrives at LFC

14.12.1959 – Shankly takes officially over at Liverpool after finishing his occupancy at Huddersfield.

19.12.1959 – Shankly is in control of his first Liverpool game, but it’s a long way from a perfect start as Liverpool lose 0-4 to Cardiff.

21.04.1962 – After seven years in the 2nd division, Liverpool are promoted with five League games remaining!

18.04.1964 – Liverpool win the championship for the sixth time in their history after a 17 year wait with an impressive 5-0 win vs Arsenal at Anfield.

01.05.1965 – Liverpool win the FA Cup for the first time in the club’s history. Shankly added that it was his finest moment at Liverpool.

FA Cup

12.05.1965 – Liverpool knocked out of the semi-finals in the club’s inaugural season in the European Cup. After a sensational 3-1 win at Anfield in the first leg, Inter beat the Reds 0-3 in Italy after bribing the referee!

30.04.1966 – Liverpool close their second League title under Shankly by beating Chelsea 2-1 at Anfield.

08.05.1971 – Liverpool lose 1-2 to Arsenal in the FA Cup – Shankly delivers the famous Chairman Mao speech.

08.07.1971 – Shankly agrees a new three-year contract with Liverpool which became his last.

23.04.1973 – After 7 years deprived of a title, Liverpool win the championship by beating Leeds 2-0 at Anfield.

23.05.1973 – Liverpool beat Gladbach 3-2 on aggregate in the UEFA Cup final, almost conceding their 3-0 lead from Anfield.

1973 – Bill voted Manager of the year, the only time in his career!

Bill Shankly Memorabilia

04.05.1974 – One of the most one-sided FA Cup finals in history when Liverpool annihilates Newcastle 3-0 at Wembley.

The shock announcement

12.07.1974 – The football world and the whole of Liverpool are stunned when Bill Shankly announces that he is retiring as Liverpool’s manager.

10.08.1974 – Shankly is given the honour of leading Liverpool out at Wembley vs Leeds in the Charity Shield despite retiring in the summer.

12.08.1974 – Bill Shankly legitimately terminates his ‘reign’ as manager of the Reds in Billy McNeill’s testimonial in front of 60,000 people at Celtic Park.

29.04.1975 – Shankly’s testimonial against a Don Revie Select XI – an emotional night at Anfield.

25.05.1977 – Shankly was in attendance when Liverpool won its first ever European Cup in Rome.

The loss of a great man

29.09.1981 – Shankly passes away. Bill suffered a cardiac arrest after battling for life since a heart attack early on Saturday morning. He had been making good progress until his condition deteriorated.

30.09.1981 – Liverpool face Finnish European Cup opponents, Oulu Palloseura, at Anfield. Reds won 7-0 and for the whole of second half the Kop sang Shankly’s name to the tune of Amazing Grace.
A banner in the crowd reads “King Shankly lives”.

King Shankly Lives

03.10.1981 – Bob Paisley and John Toshack lead out their teams at Anfield in the league. Tosh, who was now the manager of Swansea, created quite a stir among the Swansea faithful when he revealed a Liverpool shirt underneath his Swansea tracksuit when Shankly was remembered before the game.

22.11.1981 – “A Service of Thanksgiving for the life of Bill Shankly” held at Liverpool Cathedral.

A series of tributes

26.08.1982 – Shankly Gates unlocked by Bill’s widow, Nessie.

27.04.1997 – The Shankly memorial is erected – a fitting tribute in his hometown, Glenbuck.

04.12.1997 – The statue of Shankly in front of the Kop is unveiled.

June 1998 – Preston North’s End ground was replaced by a new stand named the “Bill Shankly Kop”, designed with different coloured seats providing an image of the great man’s head and shoulders.

18.12.1999 – A mosaic on the Kop to celebrate the 40th Anniversary of Bill Shankly’s arrival at Anfield.

02.08.2002 – Nessie Shankly passes away, 82 years of age.

2002 – Bill Shankly is introduced to the English Football Hall of Fame due to his impact on the English game as a manager.

08.11.2004 – Bill is introduced to the Scottish Football Association’s Hall of Fame.

01.12.2009 – 50th anniversary since he signed his contract to become manager of Liverpool Football Club.

16.12.2009 – A “SHANKS LEGEND” mosaic was unveiled on the Kop prior to kick off.

17.12.2009 – Shankly is awarded an Honorary Citizenship of Liverpool in recognition of the 50th anniversary of his arrival as manager of Liverpool FC and his dedication to Merseyside.

May 2014 – A Shankly themed hotel and museum is unveiled by Shankly’s family and Signature Living.

Bill Shankly

What was your favourite Shankly moment?

Let us know on Facebook or Twitter! Credit to www.shankly.com for providing the timeline dates.

5 Bill Shankly Stories You Must Read

Bill Shankly was a man who was never stuck for much to say, and it was his wit and warm personality that made people fall in love with him. Over the years, many people haven’t been stuck for stories about one of the world’s greatest managers, which is why we thought we’d share a few of them with you.

1. John Keith on the suspicions of Bill Shankly

John Keith, a respected sports journalist, told how Bill was once found talking to a ceiling…

“Bill Shankly’s suspicions of dirty tricks in foreign lands were always at their height when Liverpool travelled behind the former Iron Curtain. On one trip into Eastern Europe, a member of the club called at Bill’s hotel and found him standing on a chair talking to the ceiling light. ‘I know you’re there… you’re spying on us,’ Bill shouted, borrowing nothing from James Bond. Then, still glaring upwards, he demanded: ‘Why don’t you come out, you cowards?‘”

2. George Best on Bill Shankly vs The Law

George Best looked back on how Bill Shankly was once pulled over by the police for speeding…

“When Shankly was manager at Grimsby, he was stopped by the police for speeding. The officer involved told him, ‘You were going a bit fast there, Mr Shankly,’ to which Shankly replied, ‘You must have been going fast yourself to keep up with me.

Bill Shankly Liverpool

3. Tommy Docherty on Bill Shankly’s Quick Wit

Tommy Docherty recalls how Adidas planned to honour Bill…

“Adidas wanted to present him with a Golden Boot in recognition of what he’d done. Bob [Paisley] took the call and said ”They want to know what shoe size you take‘. Shanks shouted back, ‘if it’s gold, I’m a 28.

4. Patrick Barclay on Bill Shankly on Ian Callaghan

Journalist Patrick Barclay asks Shanks his opinion on LFC player Ian Callaghan

“‘I was just wondering what you thought of Ian Callaghan,‘ I asked. There was a slight paused before Shankly replied ‘Jesus Christ‘, and I thought ‘Oh no, I’ve upset him and now he’s swearing at me.’ I apologised, but he replied ‘No, no, son. I’m saying Jesus Christ is who Ian Callaghan reminds me of. Cally is the greatest man to have existed on this earth since Jesus Christ and he sets an example for everyone around him.'”

5. Ian St John on Bill Shankly Banter

Ian St John remembering the time the This is Anfield sign was placed in the ground…

“When the sign went up Liverpool were playing Newcastle. The Newcastle players are in the passage way and they see the sign. Malcolm McDonald – “Supermac” is going ‘Oh we’ve got the right ground, lads. This is Anfield.’ Shanks heard him.

They get into the dressing room, get stripped, go out to play. Liverpool won, it was 5-0. After the game, the boss goes in and knocks on their door. Joe Harvey says ‘Yes, Bill?’ ‘Is Supermac there?’ They are sitting there, they had just been battered. Shanks then went “You’ll know where it is next time.”

Have you got a favourite Shankly moment? Tell us what it is by leaving us a message below.